Nathan Fillion: Awards Host Extraordinaire

I’ve never watched the Writers Guild Awards, but I’m definitely going to this year, all because the incomparable Nathan Fillion will be hosting. When watching the Golden Globes and I saw him come up to announce the winner of one category (and oddly got paired up with Glee‘s Lea Michele for the segment), I was eager to see the audience get a taste of his characteristic wit and charm, but apparently his script called for a straight performance as opposed to a humorous one, despite the fact that he is more than capable of getting the room laughing. So hopefully as the host of the Writers Guild Awards he’ll get a chance to do just that.

I, of course, love Fillion for his leading role in Firefly, but I’ve been catching up on Castle lately, too, and it’s wonderful how the role of Rick Castle has given him the opportunity to be even goofier, which is very fitting to his personality. If you want to see some of Fillion at his silly and singing best, make sure to check out Dr. Horrible’s Sing-Along Blog. It’s a great, 45-minute 3-parter produced independently by Joss Whedon and friends during the writer’s strike. Not only does it star our beloved Nathan Fillion, but also Neal Patrick Harris and Felicia Day. Good times are had by all.


Check out the official announcement Fillion’s selection as host for the awards – he accepts the honor with his usual mix of ironic hubris and self-deprecation.

Castle Star Nathan Fillion Set to Host 2013 Writers Guild Awards West Coast Show
Gregg Mitchell @ WGA, West

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When I first accepted the honor of hosting the Writers Guild Awards, I was confused and actually thought I was receiving one. Since I play a writer on TV, I felt perhaps someone was under the impression I deserved an award and I wasn’t about to correct them. However, now I’m in the perfect position to present myself with whichever award I choose. Who’s going to know? At the very least, I can network with the most talented writers in the business in preparation for my next round of unemployment. It’s a win/win.

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Reviving ‘Arrested Development’

If you’ve seen Arrested Development, you know how undeniably amazing it is, and you may also know the frustration that many experienced when it was cancelled. It’s an old story: viewer meets show, show is amazing, show gets cancelled by (usually Fox) network because of small viewership without giving it time to grow, DVD sales and Netflix views bring show to larger audience, audience wants more! The quintessential example of this story comes in the form of Firefly, which did get revisited in the form of the film adaptation Serenity because of major fan activism and DVD sales.

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Yet Arrested Development is experiencing a revival the likes of which Firefly fans have only dreamed of: a whole 14 new episodes are being produced, all of which will be added to Netflix simultaneously. I can guarantee that I’ll be among the many viewers who binge watch the entire season in one day. The release is slated for May, with speculations of May 4th being the official date.

The complications involved in getting the actors back together while many of them have moved on to successful television (Will Arnett) and film (Jason Bateman, Michael Cera) careers and the fact that all of the episodes will be released at once has led to what looks to be a very interesting format to this so-called fourth “season” of the show, which will in fact look very little like a normal season. Check out this article about the uniqueness of this project, with comments from its star Jason Bateman and creator Mitch Hurwitz.

New ‘Arrested Development’: What to Expect
Ellen Gray @ PopMatters

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The creator and cast of “Arrested Development” were reunited Wednesday at the Television Critics Association’s winter meetings in Pasadena with the people who’d (mostly) loved them before it was cool.

Or at least before millions more people discovered the show on DVD and decided that TV critics had, after all, been right about the series, which ran for three little-watched seasons on Fox between 2003 and 2006.

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