Joss Whedon’s ‘Much Ado About Nothing’

Joss Whedon’s adaptation of Shakespeare’s Much Ado About Nothing had its U.S. premiere yesterday at SXSW, and its trailer was also just released. To commemorate, the Much Ado official party bus:

Much-Ado-Party-Bus

I had the opportunity to go to the world premiere of Much Ado at the Toronto International Film Festival, and I can tell you, it is incredible. I have written on it extensively for my own work, but don’t feel like sifting through all those pages to find something short enough and pertinent enough to share with you right now. So instead, I’ll just leave you with the beautifully jazzy trailer and extend an invitation to celebrate with me this wonderful film.

Huzzah!

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Can Adaptations Be Better Than Their Originals?

Although we are in an era of shocking un-originality, inundated with sequels, spin-offs, and adaptations, sometimes there is some value in the “derivative” practice of adaptation. There are many instances where an adapted work is much more successful than its original, and the article below lists and discusses 14 such examples, complete with clips for demonstration.

The best example, in my opinion, is Buffy the Vampire Slayer. Joss Whedon’s original concept was a film that was made in 1992, but was unfortunately skewed from his intentions simply by having the wrong director. Whedon intended the film to be taken seriously, while Fran Rubel Kuzui turned it into a campy, cheesy teen horror flick. When given the opportunity to turn it into a show, then, Whedon indisputably redeemed Buffy, producing the clever, witty, and insightful series that lasted seven seasons and is now in its 9th season in comic book form, continuing to enchant audiences to this day.

What are your favorite examples of adaptations that are better than their originals?

Clear eyes, full hearts, eh, I’ll just wait for the TV show: 14 TV series that usurped their original film versions
Jason Heller, Joel Keller, Noel Murray, Nathan Rabin, Tasha Robinson, and Scott Tobias @ A.V. Club

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In the hierarchy of entertainment, television adaptations are generally considered poor relations of the films that spawned them. Oftentimes adaptations of films never make it past the pilot stage, like an ill-fated 1997 television version of Fargo starring Edie Falco. Even when television adaptations do make it onto a network schedule, they seldom make it past a single season. But every once in a while, a television adaptation—official, loose, or otherwise—usurps its big-screen version in the public’s imagination.

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We Finally Get to Hear ‘How He Met Their Mother’

How I Met Your Mother started out great. I was super into it for several seasons, but it gradually lost its appeal as we all realized–hey, they aren’t actually going to tell us how he met his kids’ mother until the very frakking end. Gratefully, the show has been picked up for it’s ninth and final season, so we will finally hear the end of that story. Now, I can appreciate formulating a show based on where’ it is going, but that doesn’t mean you just twiddle your thumbs for eight freaking seasons until you are about to get cancelled and then finally tell us your point. If anything, it would have been more interesting to see how Ted met “the one” and then show us the ups and downs of the relationship before ending it with, say, having a kid, showing that this is in fact the mother of his children and not just another girlfriend or fiancée or even wife (because wife does not necessarily equal mother of one’s children).

Yet despite my qualms with the show, I have kept up with watching it for a few key reasons. Reason #1: Neal Patrick Harris. I love that man so much. And it is a severe detriment to womankind that he loves men, and at the same time a great tribute to humankind for being such a fine example of a happy gay man with beautiful children and a lovely, happy family. I also love the fact that his partner plays Scooter in HIMYM.

Alyson Hannigan and Alexis Denisof join in the Halloween fun as they dress up as seahorses with their daughters Satyana and Keeva, in Los AngelesWhich brings me to my next favorite thing about the show: all of the cameos from my favorites, especially those from Whedon shows. Not only is Alyson Hannigan a brilliant member of the regular cast, they have also brought in her husband Alexis Denisof  and former on-screen lover Seth Green, and many more Whedon alums (plus Cobie Smulders is now participating in the Whedonverse–what a lucky gal with all her connections). I’m seriously waiting for the day they bring in Amber Benson and finally let Lilly indulge in her overt lesbian fantasies.

Also, reason #3: Jason Segel. Need I say more?

But most of all I am looking forward to finally getting this shit wrapped up. No matter ho much I love the show, it needs to stop stringing us a long, and finally give a conclusive answer to the question of “How I Met Your Mother.” It’s unfortunate that they won’t keep going after this final 9th season, because I’m sure there’s much more they could do without still avoiding that question, but at least they will (hopefully) conclude with a solid resolution that satisfies us all.

What do you think? Are you glad HIMYM is finally coming to an end? Or do you think they should keep going with it, even after Ted meets his “soul mate”? Tell me in the comments!

‘How I Met Your Mother’ officially renewed for FINAL season

The Magician's Code Part One

It’s official! After extensive negotiations, CBS has renewed How I Met Your Mother for a ninth season.

And this rumor is now confirmed too: Next season will mark the long-running comedy’s final outing.

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